Push for a working NDIS

As a result of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) we have strongly advocated around three main areas of concern.

We are deeply concerned about the defunding of Victorian community-based psychosocial support in the wake of the NDIS.

The ongoing instability of mental health funding around Australia is leaving many consumers vulnerable, without reliable access to support.

We will continue to advocate for changes to improve the scheme and the refunding of Victorian services.

Meeting with state and federal policy-makers, as well as advocating through peak bodies and member organisations, we continue to push for changes to funding to meet the realities of people living with mental illness.

Need for assertive outreach

We are deeply concerned about the defunding of Victorian community-based psychosocial support in the wake of the NDIS. The ongoing instability of mental health funding around Australia is leaving many consumers vulnerable, without reliable access to support. We will continue to advocate for changes to improve the scheme and the refunding of Victorian services.

Meeting with state and federal policy-makers, as well as advocating through peak bodies and member organisations, we continue to push for changes to funding to meet the realities of people living with mental illness.

Need for early intervention

While the NDIS does address early intervention, the focus is on early intervention for children. We have advocated for the need for early intervention initiatives and support for people of all ages, to prevent acute episodes and avoid higher levels of trauma.

The gap and its impact

The episodic nature of mental illness does not easily match the NDIS’ idea of ‘enduring and persistent impairment’, which can result in many people falling through the ‘gap’. With the defunding of community-based mental health services, people who may engage on average with a Neami service for around two years, and return periodically for additional support when they are experiencing crisis or are becoming unwell, can no longer access community-based mental health services, yet they also don’t meet the NDIS criteria for support.

We continue to share outcome data and consumer stories to explain how the changes introduced by this scheme are resulting in people falling through a ‘gap’, and the impact that this has on individuals’ lives.

‘I was taught by the old school how to do things. But Sally and the NDIS have taught me new skills.’
Prad

Pursuing better mental health and wellbeing with the NDIS

Our wholly owned subsidiary, Me Well, delivered NDIS services and supported customers in their transition to the NDIS.

Now in its second year of operation, Me Well supported people across Victoria and continued to build services in New South Wales and Western Australia. With the slowing of the NDIS rollout in South Australia, we supported current consumers to prepare for the transition. We established our Me Well presence in Queensland, where we will ramp up our service offering over the next 12 months.

We first embarked on NDIS service delivery to provide continuity of support to consumers and to expand how we deliver on our vision and mission. With a deeper understanding of NDIS service design and the financial challenges of the NDIS environment, we continue to evaluate and adapt our service offering. Through Me Well, we will continue to provide support coordination and capacity building services.

We remain committed to supporting people under the NDIS, and the future of Me Well in providing high-quality and safe NDIS services.

Me Well staff worked with 858 customers across New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria and Western Australia.
Where Me Well customers are located
Type of service Me Well customers accessed